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Safety Tips for DIY Roof Inspections

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General Safety When it comes to inspecting, repairing or installing a roof, the professionals at Coverall Construction near Chesterfield Township, Michigan recommend that safety should be your highest priority. Do not make the common mistake of skipping good safety practices because they take too much time. Those short-cuts may cost you dearly in the long-run. Don’t cut corners with safety it makes it all the more likely that an accident will happen—so why take that chance? There are many safety issues to consider if you are planning to install your own roof. It’s imperative that you take the proper precautions in order to avoid serious injury or even death. Some of the most important areas to address are:roof inspection

 

Secure the landing zone Make sure you have a clean, organized work space. Block it off from foot traffic especially children and pets, tools can be dangerous in the wrong hands. Look up, Look down, Look All Around! Don’t let yourself fall victim to an accident because you failed to observe your surroundings. Identify and avoid all site danger areas, such as power lines, cable and phone lines, unsafe roof access areas, and ground hazards such as uneven surfaces, deep mud, loose gravel, broken payment and landscaping.

 

Prevent Falls Accidents related to falls account for most of serious injuries and deaths in construction. Professional Roofing Magazine found that an average of six roofers dies each month in the U.S. from falls. Don’t let yourself become a statistic, put safety first and minimize your risk of slipping and falling. In 2011there were 3 roof related injuries in Chesterfield Township, an area just a few miles away that we service regularly. Some basic safety recommendations are: - Never work on a wet roof or one covered in ice or snow. - Keep your work area as clean of dirt, tools, and debris as possible. - Wear safe footwear—soft-soled boots provide the best roof traction. - When working on a steeply pitched roof, protect yourself with safety equipment such as a safety harness, net, and guardrails. - Set up and climb your ladder properly. - Always wear a helmet to protect your head and prevent more serious injury if you fall.

 

Get up and down safety Only use ladders that conform to local codes or are approved by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration in the US. Ladders and other equipment that have years of lasting use are never the place to bargain shop. Buy a quality product and it will last for years and help keep you safe. Be sure to take an extra 30 seconds and inspect your ladder carefully before each use. If you don’t have a quality ladder, search out a friend or neighbor instead of using something that is damaged or makeshift. A quality ladder is only as good as the person using it. Make sure to set up your ladder properly. Place the ladder on solid, level footing (driveways that slope down away from the roof are a serious risk for ladders). Tie your ladder off at the top or secure with a plywood brace. Set your ladder against a solid backing.

 

Important Note: We advise you extend your ladder a minimum of 36 inches above the landing or roof eave to provide a secure location to grab when transitioning from the roof to the ladder. Remember it isn’t a race! Climb slowly and safely, the roof isn’t going anywhere. Always face the ladder, use one rung at a time, never slide down a ladder, and do not overload your ladder. Don’t push a ladder in to “stretch” it because it’s too short; that makes it too steep and unstable. Make sure you don’t have to reach or stretch too far off the ladder. Never leave positioned ladders unattended, the last thing you want is the ladder falling or someone climbing it unexpectedly. Whenever you leave the jobsite either remove all ladders from your work area every day or lock them together on the ground overnight.

+ Ladder Safety Note: Always, Always, Always - Keep ladders away from electrical wires and boxes at all times! Metal ladders and electricity is a recipe for disaster.

+ Electrical Safety Note: Electricity can leap or “arc” from a wire to a metal ladder several feet away. Make sure to use a non-conductive ladder such as wood or fiberglass when working near wires. Never touch electrical wires with your hands or tools. Remember that metal materials such as flashing and drip edge should never touch electrical wires.

+ Ask the Electrical Experts: If it’s working near electrical wires is absolutely required, call your local power company first. They should inspect the wires and insulate them if necessary.

+ Hammer Safety Note: When using a hammer, always wear eye protection. Strike nails squarely to reduce the chance of nails flying back at you. Discard damaged hammers with cracked handles or heads. Never strike a hardened steel hammer against another hardened steel object.

+ Power Nailer Safety Note: Treat this tool with extreme care. A pneumatic nail gun is basically a weapon. Check the operation of the safety; never tie back or disengage the safety. Only use when the gun is on the material to be fastened. Use a well-lubricated and inspected nail gun. Do not rest the tool against your body to eliminate misfires. Use caution with air power—only use clean, dry compressed air, disconnect the air supply as soon as you are finished, never work on the tool when connected to the air supply, and inspect hoses for breaks or leaks. Keep the tool clean and maintained properly. Never point nails guns at people.

+ Utility Knife Safety Note: Always cut away from your body. Don’t use a dull blade; dull blades have to be forced, increasing the chances of slipping. Replace blades frequently. Retract the blade when storing to reduce the chance of accidental cuts. Remember, always cut away from your body to help prevent injury.

 

How you handle Material matters Most us know that lifting heavy objects can result injury. When lifting heavy materials, always use your legs, not your back. Your legs carry you all day and are naturally better prepared to handle the additional load. Be prepared to be tired and surprised. Until you have experienced it a few times the sheer volume of material that must be delivered and moved around a roofing jobsite can be a little overwhelming. Again remember it isn’t a race, carry one bundle at a time—carrying too much fatigues the body and is unsafe on ladders and rooftops. Keep the material close to (but outside) the work area—the closer to the job, the less time and energy wasted retrieving material. You can find more detailed information on roofing safety through various sources online. Here are just a few you may wish to review: In the U.S., the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issues guidelines for Residential Fall Protection (the use of nets, guardrails, harnesses, etc.). GAF recommends compliance with these guidelines.

Article Source: http://www.roofer911.com





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This company generates a great deal of confidence: professional, reasonably priced, responsive, clear and communicative, skilled, experienced, all the processes streamlined for ease and quickness. From the first phone call, through the estimate and work done, everything was taken care of in one day; just in time for a worry-free downpour.
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